Connect with us

Conservation Africa News Magazine | African Wildlife & Conservation News

Conservation Africa News Magazine | African Wildlife & Conservation News

Wildlife Conservation Awareness – Grizzly bears in the dark as they try to share living space with humans: study – Airdrie Today


Conservation Awareness

Wildlife Conservation Awareness – Grizzly bears in the dark as they try to share living space with humans: study – Airdrie Today

EDMONTON — Grizzly bears are doing their best to get along with people, but it still isn’t enough. Newly published research concludes that without large wilderness areas to replenish their numbers, grizzlies would disappear from landscapes they share with humans. “The persistence of bears near people, when we see them along highways or near towns, they’re really…

Wildlife Conservation Awareness – Grizzly bears in the dark as they try to share living space with humans: study – Airdrie Today

Wildlife Conservation Awareness –

EDMONTON — Grizzly bears are doing their best to get along with people, but it still isn’t enough.

Newly published research concludes that without large wilderness areas to replenish their numbers, grizzlies would disappear from landscapes they share with humans.

“The persistence of bears near people, when we see them along highways or near towns, they’re really propped up by the fact they exist near some sort of secure wilderness,” said Clayton Lamb, a University of Alberta biologist and lead author of a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Researchers found bears in populated areas in Alberta and British Columbia have even changed how they hunt in an attempt to share living space with humans.

“The bears are doing what they can,” Lamb said. “The difference might have to be made up by us.”

The study set out to examine an emerging phenomenon in wildlife conservation — large carnivores re-establishing themselves on mixed landscapes including cities, highways, rural communities and patchworks of natural habitat.

It digested 41 years worth of mortality, movement and demography among 2,669 grizzlies over nearly 400,000 square kilometres of British Columbia.

It found mortality has increased steeply with the amount of human impact measured through an index that includes human population, land use, infrastructure, coastlines, roads, railroads and navigable rivers.

Deaths have outnumbered births and the difference is being made up through emigration of young grizzlies from nearby wilderness. For every point the index increases, a local bear population must increase the number of individuals it draws by about two per cent.

“Grizzly bear range is quite tied to the distance from some secure piece of wilderness,” said Lamb.

That’s despite the grizzlies’ efforts to adapt to humans. The study found young, newly arrived bears gradually learned ways to avoid contact, such as hunting and gathering at night.

Adolescent bears in areas dominated by humans have increased their nocturnal time by up to three per cent annually, which has led to corresponding increases in survival. The cost, however, is steep. 

The scientists found it takes 14 years for a grizzly to learn how to co-exist with humans. For every bear that makes it, 29 don’t. 

“A lot of those bears would have been born on a mountaintop 10 kilometres away and lived with mom in an avalanche chute and lived a normal bear life,” Lamb said.

“Then they find a home near town and get lured in by an apple tree. The gauntlet they have to run is very difficult.”

The study shows that high mortality has impacts far from where the deaths take place. Bears dying in mixed-used areas draws more grizzlies from the wilderness to take their place. 

“Conflicts with people have rippling effects on (bear) populations far removed,” Lamb said. 

The Most Powerful Sale & Affiliate Platform Available!

There's no credit card required! No fees ever.

Create Your Free Account Now!

Highway overpasses are one good way to reduce deaths, he suggests. But humans living with bears have to get better at removing attractants such as roadkill or fruit trees to end the bears’ constant, often fatal, migration from the wilderness.  

“We’re not quite there,” said Lamb. “The system relies quite heavily on adjacent wilderness.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 7, 2020

— Follow @row1960 on Twitter

Bob Weber, The Canadian Press

Subscribe to the newsletter news

We hate SPAM and promise to keep your email address safe

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Top Stories

Volunteering In Africa And Enrich Your World 2020
Importance of Wildlife Conservation

Conservation Awareness

Importance of Wildlife Conservation

By July 30, 2020
Wildlife Conservation Volunteer - Caring For Native Wildlife
Wildlife Conservation Awareness – Congress wants to fix public lands. It’s just a bandage on the wounds Trump caused | Sally Jewell and Ken Salazar
Wildlife Conservation Awareness – Times Evoke: ‘Our apathy threatens biodiversity’
Wildlife Conservation Awareness – U.S. Congress approves conservation bill
Wildlife Conservation Awareness – Black Rhino Academy / NLÉ
Wildlife Conservation Awareness – This 12-year-old bottle terrarium is teeming with lush life
Wildlife Conservation Awareness – Animals Appreciate Recent Traffic Lull
Wildlife Conservation Awareness – As New York COVID-19 Hospitalizations Drop, Gov. Cuomo Urges Vigilance
Wildlife Conservation Awareness – Rewilding immunology
Wildlife Conservation Awareness – Grizzly bears in the dark as they try to share living space with humans: study – Airdrie Today
Wildlife Conservation Awareness – Maharashtra: Tillari area in Sindhudurg declared conservation reserve
Wildlife Conservation Awareness – Scientists call for pandemic investigations to focus on wildlife trade

Tags

Volunteering In Africa And Enrich Your World 2020
Wildlife Conservation Jobs – How to Volunteer Internationally Without Traveling
Importance of Wildlife Conservation

Conservation Awareness

Importance of Wildlife Conservation

By July 30, 2020
Conservation Africa News – Friday Five with Olubunmi Adeyemi
Wildlife Conservation Society – Does it pay to protect nature? A new study weighs in – Reuters.com
Wildlife Conservation Volunteer - Caring For Native Wildlife
Conservation Africa News – Botswana finds more dead elephants, says test results due this week – Reuters
Conservation Africa News – Daily briefing: “The pandemic is gaining full momentum” in Africa
Corona Virus Outbreak
Conservation Africa News – Timeline: How the coronavirus pandemic unfolded – Reuters India
Wildlife Conservation Society – David Attenborough in appeal to save charity behind London Zoo – Reuters
Conservation Africa News – Pangolin protectors, an inflatable lab and young stars — June’s best science images
Conservation Africa News – Listening to nature: Notes from Session 1 of TED2020
Wildlife Conservation Awareness – Congress wants to fix public lands. It’s just a bandage on the wounds Trump caused | Sally Jewell and Ken Salazar
Conservation Africa News – One Tree Planted And The Jane Goodall Institute Announce Partnership On Critical Restoration Project In Africa
To Top